Tag : Email

Blasted by Phishing Calendar Invitations

calendar

Have you been getting random calendar invitations from unfamiliar sources about events you have never heard of before? It seems we are not the only ones. Most of the calendar invitations seem to be coming from email accounts from other countries, promising deals on brand name products such as Ray-Bans.

This is just another type of phishing scam. Do not accept or decline calendar invitations from unknown senders. If possible, try not to open the invitation at all, and if you do open the invitation, do not click any links that may be attached. From what we know about email phishing and malware, this is most likely an attempt at retrieving personal information from your device.

Apple is in the process of blocking the suspicious email addresses and hopefully putting a quick end to the unknown invitations. In the meantime, you can do a few things to protect yourself. Firstly, do not decline the invitations, this only alerts the sender of an active email account, and will most likely lead to even more invitations. Go into your calendar settings and change invitations to be sent via email rather than device iPhone notifications. Finally you can create a junk calendar, purely for these spam invitations. These are temporary alternatives while we wait for Apple to block the email addresses and secure the problem. If you would like to create an alternative calendar for these invitations, which is the best way to protect yourself at the moment, click here.

 


If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit: www.mashable.com

 

Lost all your emails in Outlook 2011 for Mac? Not a problem!!

Accidentally deleted everything in your Outlook 2011 email inbox on an Apple Mac? Not to worry, one of our lead techs stumbled upon this quick fix!

Deleting items such as emails and contact list entries means that they are moved to your Deleted Items folder. Now, if you empty the Deleted Items folder, they are removed form your inbox but will remain potentially recoverable for 28 days. To recover lost emails, go into the Deleted Items folder and select the emails you would like to recover. You can always select more than one by holding the ctrl button as you you click.

In the ribbon at the top, click the ‘Move’ icon and select the folder you would like to restore the emails to, such as ‘Inbox’ in this case. Voila!

Deleted-file

You can also recover them by through OWA (the Outlook Web App) at:

exchange.sussex.ac.uk/owa/


 

The information presented in the blog is courtesy of the University of Sussex, please visit http://www.sussex.ac.uk/its/help/faq?faqid=2277, for original content.

 

VMware takes on the big boys with Boxer app for AirWatch

VMware launched a new version of the Boxer iOS app earlier this month and its pretty awesome. The app is for companies using VMware to manage their employee’s mobile devices VMware Boxer is available for both AirWatch and Workspace One customers. The app includes some attractive features, not surprising as Boxer is intended to replace the preloaded Mail feature on the Apple iPhone and iPad.

screen-shot-2015-10-15-at-9-03-16-amThe new app allows for preference customization such as change of sound when new emails arrives. You can also take different actions by swiping email messages, and easily bulk edit messages. The app combines email and calendar taking away the need to navigate away from Boxer in order to see your calendar events. Similar to other applications put forth by Microsoft and Google in terms of functionality.

Boxer VMware will be made free for AirWatch users on the orange, blue and yellow plans. For those who have already committed their email needs to VMware, no need to worry. If you are one of the many that still want VMware purely for email management, VMware will release a special build on the app that will let consumers more more slowly and provide more time between updates. Most consumer and commercial users will be presented with rapid release updates as they are made available, but the extra feature for businesses that wish to update at a slower pace is an attractive option.


 

If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit: VMware goes after Outlook with Boxer email app for Airwatch

 

Outlook 2011 for Macs

Microsoft released Office 2011 for Mac, which for the first time, includes a Mac-specific version of Outlook. Outlook is the MAPI (Messaging API) client for Microsoft Exchange server, and so we’ve seen several clients of ours go out and buy Macs to put on their Windows Active Directory networks. This would be just fine, but they then find that they cannot get the new Outlook for Mac to work – it just cannot see their old Exchange server!
Our “Fine Print” department tells us that this new version of Outlook will only see Exchange 2007 or 2010. This is because it is not actually a MAPI client. It instead uses Exchange Web Services to access the Exchange data, something that was introduced with Exchange 2007 and carried into Exchange 2010.
The previous client for Macs, Entourage, made use of WebDAV and could connect to Exchange 2003 or 2007, but that functionality was removed with 2010.
So if you want your Macs to have full Outlook features, the solution is simple: convince your IT department, and the people who rule them, that it’s time to upgrade your Exchange servers!

Secure Email Encryption – Zixmail

BVA gets several requests month in and month out for a good way to send secure emails.  There is really no way to answer this with a cheap method.  There are a few great solutions out there though they can be a little costly but here recently we found a method that is pretty cheap and very reliable.  ZixCorp Email Encryption Services is a solution tool that can protect your sensitive mail data.  ZixMail is the name of their product and it basically provides desktop email encryption that includes automated key management and delivery to anyone, anywhere through a secure web portal. It can be used with any corporate or web-based email system, and optional plug-ins are available for full integration with Microsoft Outlook.

ZixMail makes it easy to securely send and receive confidential information. Encrypted messages are delivered using your existing email address, and a single ZixMail client can support multiple email addresses. ZixMail also provides time stamping and authentication for irrefutable proof of delivery and receipt.

If your recipient is not a ZixCorp customer, not an issue…ZixMail automatically sends your email to ZixPort, a secure messaging portal that can be used to deliver secure email to any address.  The majority of your clients are strong Microsoft environments and this solution works great with it. ZixCorp provides a special ZixMail plug-in so you can send and receive encrypted email without ever leaving Outlook. The plug-in integrates the ZixMail functionality directly into Outlook’s toolbar. The simple click of a button is all it takes to encrypt or decrypt a message.

Automated Key Management
ZixMail takes care of the most complicated aspect of using email encryption – key management. With ZixMail, all key management is handled through ZixDirectorySM, ZixCorp’s hosted public key repository. Tens of millions of members are included in ZixDirectory, allowing ZixMail users to automatically send and receive encrypted emails from other ZixMail or ZixGateway customers. No key set-up or exchange is necessary.

Charity scams on the rise in the aftermath of Japan quake

Within hours of the earthquake & tsunami in Japan, online scams were popping up on various social media sites, claiming to be charitable organizations, or to represent valid ones like the Red Cross.  In addition to falsely soliciting donations via Facebook and email, these fraudulent “charities” are also used to spread malware.

So please be careful when you go to donate to a cause or offer assistance, and be sure the organization is valid.

More info: http://www.securityweek.com/massive-influx-scams-surrounding-japans-earthquake-and-tsunami-expected

iPads Usage Up – Businesses have bought 2 Million Units

I was at a conference last week and saw a funny thing that I did not think would ensue so quickly in the technology and business environment.  Sitting in the meeting with 25 other people, both business and technical folks, about 80% of them had iPads which was shocking really.  More and more with our client base, iPads are starting to take over as the presentation tool and fun toy for the “c” level executives.  Several of my own team member here at BVA own and leverage iPads in business activity, but for the most part it’s not adding value in my humble view in a business perceptive.  It’s definitely moved into the benefit category as opposed to the NEED one.  That being said it is a nice product that has it’s place in the residential side as well as the educational sector.  The unit is not very secure and has alot of the security risks associated with the iPhone.  ??The iPad can be used to access networks via RDP session (remote session) and actually works very well and quick on the 3G network but that still raises the question of security and access points for your network.  I read an article here recently, that talked about how popular the iPad is with business and that a research company estimates that 2 million iPads have already been bought by companies with 1-99 employees. That is hard to believe but its a fact, the adoption rate is higher for companies with at least 20 employees.

The research article surfaced that the common uses for the device include demos, presentations, email, and Internet browsing. Larger businesses also use them as a tool when speaking with customers. Most of the businesses are using the iPad as a new gadget; it is not replacing PCs or other devices.  The research company believes that notebooks, netbooks, tablets, and smartphones will continue to coexist in the future as data moves into the cloud. Technically does not provide further statistics from its survey or the number of people and type of survey it conducted. Having said that, it is encouraging to see small businesses adopting a device like the iPad.

It will be interesting what Apple decides to do with their new market share in the business segment.  Will they decide to alter their OS code to be more desktop centric?  It’s a great way to penetrate a market that Apple quite frankly has ignored.

Capabilities and Limitations of the Apple iPad in a Standard Business Network Environment

The iPad is a great device. It’s light, ultra-portable, and you don’t have to take it out of your carry-on for airport security. It’s sleek and sexy. It’s remarkably versatile. Many people wonder: can I replace my Window laptop or MacBook with it? If I add a Bluetooth keyboard, is it a netbook?

You can try, but it’s like trying to get a Corvette to replace a pickup truck: they both serve the same fundamental purpose, but they each excel at different things. You can try to get your pickup up to 180 MPH, and you can try to haul a ton of bricks in your Corvette. With enough effort, “McGyver”-ing, and aftermarket accessories, you could no doubt accomplish each. But is it a good idea? And if you think it through ahead of time, do you really want to?

The longing to replace a laptop with an iPad is easy to understand. An iPad travels well. It’s simple to connect it to a Wi-Fi network, and you don’t have to wait for it to boot up. The battery lasts. When you’re not working, you can use it to play music, movies, or games. It’s a terrific reader for news and e-books. It’s a great email client for Gmail, AOL, and (if your company’s mail system supports it and the corporate policies allow it) Exchange mail, calendar, and contacts using ActiveSync.

But it’s important to remember that the iPad is NOT a laptop or a tablet PC. And, despite being an Apple product, it’s NOT a MacBook. It isn’t built on Windows or Mac OS X – its operating system (iOS) was originally developed for the iPhone. The interface uses multi-touch gestures and an accelerometer, making possible applications that can’t run on a PC or Mac. That also means that applications written for a PC or Mac can’t run on an iPad – unless the author specifically develops a version for iOS. Even then, they would need to publish their application through the Apple App Store (thus sharing their proceeds with Apple) – or you would need to jailbreak your iPad, voiding the warranty.

Importantly, the iPad (like the iPhone and iPod Touch) does NOT support Adobe Flash or Java, meaning that websites that use those technologies won’t behave as designed. Why not? Apple CEO Steve Jobs called the Adobe product insecure, buggy, battery-intensive, and incompatible with a touch interface.

The iPad is better at consuming information than it is at creating it. It’s great for creating and editing smaller emails and documents, but you’ll want a PC to create large or complex documents. Another challenge: once you’ve created or edited the smaller documents, you can email them from the iPad, but only one file per email. To send multiple files, you need to send multiple emails. This can be pretty cumbersome. You’ll note that as you explore the iPad you won’t even encounter the concept of a “file” as you would on a PC or Mac.

To think of the iPad as a replacement for a netbook, notebook, or MacBook is like thinking of the Corvette as a replacement for a Ford F350. Is it fair to call the iPad an overgrown iPhone? No. It’s a terrific multi-function device with some very valuable business purposes in specific situations. Should you expect it to behave like a Windows machine or Mac? You’ll only end up frustrated if you do.

Love the iPad for what it is, and don’t hate it for what it isn’t. And don’t expect your IT consulting company to help you make it do what it’s not designed to do – they can’t fit a ton of bricks in a Corvette, either.

So… what CAN the iPad do in a business network environment? In other words, what is reasonable to expect your company’s I.T. team to support?

  • Email access. If your company allows remote email access from a smartphone using POP or IMAP protocols, you can do it from your iPad. Note, however, that it’s up to you go get the iPad connected to the Internet on the remote Wi-Fi. If you have a 3G iPad, getting it on the Internet is strictly between you, Apple, and AT&T.
  • Calendar/Contact synchronization – if your company has a fairly new Exchange server and the network is configured to allow ActiveSync access. If you have a non-BlackBerry smartphone that wirelessly syncs Calendar/Contacts, your iPad can also.
  • Remote Desktop to a Terminal Server – if your company has a Terminal Server. If you have access using Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Connection software for either Windows or Mac, you can have access from your iPad. Be sure to get a good RDP app such as iTap RDP, which makes it easier to operate a Windows desktop from with the iPad’s smaller display, and makes the best use of the iPad’s direct manipulation and multi-touch gestures.
  • VPN access. If your company allows VPN connections from other devices, such as an IPSec VPN tunnel to a Cisco firewall or a PPTP connection to a Windows RAS Server, you can have the same connection from your iPad. You might use it to establish a Remote Desktop Connection to your office workstation, if your company’s policies allow this.

Now… what CAN’T you expect your company’s I.T. team to support? Pretty much anything not listed above. At its heart, the iPad is a consumer device, and is probably not included in the list of officially-sanctioned “clients” for your company’s server-based applications. There’s no doubt that the iPad will continue to evolve, and new apps are released every day that enhance its functionality and usefulness. But, as a mobile network device, it presents challenges in terms of data security, bandwidth usage, and compatibility. These translate into significant I.T. support costs, so don’t be too surprised if your company won’t support it.