Tag : protection

Antivirus – Top 4 on the Market in 2016

 

Keep your computer healthy and your stress low, with an easy to manage antivirus software. A wealth of options exist, so with the help of researcher Neil Rubenking at PCMag, we have comprised a list of the top antivirus programs. Each product has been reviewed and lab tested in order to provide real results and data. In times of trouble no one wants a program that can’t handle the pressure.

Top 4 Commercial Antivirus Software on the Market

Kaspersky Anti-Virus (2016)1444039371_kaspersky-antivirus-2016-16.0.0.424

  • On Demand Malware Scan
  • On Access Malware Scan
  • Malicious URL Blocking
  • Phishing Protection
  • Bonus – Vulnerability Scan

 

 

Bitdefender Antivirus Plus 2016

Both Bitdefender and Kaspersky performed at the top of the scale in independent Lab tests.

  • On Demand Malware Scan
  • On Access Malware Scan
  • Malicious URL Blocking
  • Phishing Protection
  • Bonus – Vulnerability Scan
  • Website Ratingbd2016-boxshots-av-online-en_1_2

McAfee AntiVirus Plus (2016)

A single subscription of McAfee AntiVirus Plus allows you to install protection on all of your Windows, Android, Mac OS, and iOS devices.

  • On Demand Malware Scan Product_Page_Product-Overview_Pack-image_AntiVirus-Plus_320x430
  • On Access Malware Scan
  • Malicious URL Blocking
  • Phishing Protection
  • Bonus – Vulnerability Scan
  • Website Rating

 

 

 

Webroot SecureAnywhere Antivirus (2016)

Webroot SecureAnywhere Antivirus uses an  unusual behavior based detection technology. This makes Webroot the tiniest antivirus on the market today. This is both good and bad. In theory this Antivirus can protection you from malware, but it can also flag legitimate behaviors made by legitimate users.

  • On Demand Malware Scan
  • On Access Malware Scan
  • Malicious URL Blocking
  • Phishing Protection
  • Website Rating

Antivirus program

 

 

If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit:The Best Antivirus Utilities for 2016

Google Has Axed Postini

bva found out today that the rumors are true which we have know for some time.  Google will retire Postini, migrate features to Google Apps for all their 26 million users.  Google has built the e-mail security and archiving features into two Google Apps products, which it will transition to customers next year.  This will be an interesting transition and move over to a new platform.

The Web announced the transition today, saying that it has spent the last year building Postini’s features into Google Apps for Business, a professional suite, and Google Apps Vault, an e-mail archiving and discovery service.
“With this transition to Google Apps, you can receive similar email security, protection, and archiving, but through the more robust Google Apps service,” Google said in a company blog post. “Google Apps also works with mail servers such as Microsoft Exchange and Lotus Notes, so you don’t need to switch to Gmail.”

How customer services will transition:

Customers receiving information about the transition process at least 60 days before their migration is scheduled to begin. Customers who do not wish to transition to Google Apps will see their Postini service terminated at the end of their contract.

The service currently has about 26 million users. Google acquired Postini for $625 million in 2007.

Microsoft Security Essentials

Having good anti-virus is a must, it is not a benefit.  That being said there are a several on the market right now that you cannot trust.  Microsoft has done a  soft-released Microsoft Security Essentials 2.0 (free, direct) last month with little fanfare.  Technically the product name is still just Microsoft Security Essentials, but the box shows a version number beginning with 2.0. This version has a few new features which is okay I suppose, nothing out of the ordinary. It can automatically ensure firewall protection by enabling Windows Firewall if necessary. In Windows Vista and Windows 7, Microsoft Security Essentials’ new network inspection system adds specific protection against network-based attacks. The app also claims better malware-fighting skills, though in my testing it seemed little improved.  Last year AV-Test (http://av-test.org) evaluated a collection of antivirus products under Windows XP and under Windows 7. They rated each product for protection, usability, and ability to repair malware damage, with six points available in each area and a total of 12 needed for certification. Under Windows 7, Microsoft Security Essentials made the cut with 14 points, not far behind the 16 points achieved by top scorers Norton AntiVirus 2011 ($39.99 direct, 4.5 stars), Kaspersky Anti-Virus 2011 ($59.95 direct for three licenses, 3.5 stars), and Panda Antivirus Pro 2011 ($50.95 direct for three licenses, 3.5 stars).  Windows XP test, Microsoft took just 11.5 points, not enough for certification. It score high for usability but low for protection and repair.

Installation and Cleanup: Installing an antivirus on my thirteen malware-infested virtual machines can be an arduous task. Some products take a long time to install and update; others won’t even install due to self-defense by malware. Microsoft Security Essentials didn’t give me any trouble; it installed quickly and smoothly.  Microsoft Security Essentials’ real-time protection system detected active malware right away and popped up a simple warning box with a button offering to clean the computer. There’s a link to get details; clicking it also offers a chance to change the disposition for the found threat.

The real-time cleanup involves a mini-scan that frequently ends with a request to reboot. The product necessarily turns on automatic updates, so if for some reason you’ve been putting off updates you’ll be in for a lengthy session during that first reboot.  At installation, the product schedules a weekly quick scan. You can change the schedule and the type of scan, if desired. By default the scheduled scan restricts itself to using 50 percent of CPU resources. That doesn’t affect on-demand scans, though. In testing, a full scan took over 50 minutes regardless of the CPU setting, which is about twice the average of recent products. A repeat scan came in under 25 minutes.  For most found threats, Microsoft Security Essentials simply takes the necessary remediation action, though it will occasionally ask permission to remove low-risk items like adware. At the end of a scan it reports that it finished; you can click the History tab to see what it did.  Microsoft Security Essentials detected 89 percent of the rootkit samples. That’s good, but more than half of the recent antivirus products detected 100 percent.

I would rate this product a 6 out of 10 for performance and accuracy.