Tag : USB

Remove a Virus from a USB using CMD

Viruses change the attributes of a file or folder, such as the read, write, or execute permission, making such files or folders extremely hard to access. In order to recover a file, we can change the attributes of a file and reset the file’s internal structure. Thats why it is a great tool to know how to remove one using CMD. Amar Shekhar, writer for FossBytes, gives us the low down.

A virus can present itself in your system as a file format that can be hidden from a user, present in a form ‘autorun’ or ‘autoexec’, an exec file or a file with different attribute properties. Examples of such would be, Autorun.inf, Ravmon.exe, New Folder.exe,  and svchost.exe. So how do you remove a virus using CMD from any USB ? Assuming you are already on Windows 10 that is.

Using the cmd command called ‘attrib’ command, will change the attributes of a file, folder, or directory responsible for display, setting and removing attributes such as read-only and archive.

Say there is a virus on your drive.

Run command prompt as administrator. 

Change the drive to the one with the virus, in the case of the researcher this is the D drive. Then press Enter. 

Type attrib and press enter. This command lists all of the files inside the current drive, which makes it easy to identify which is housing the autorun.info virus. 

autorun.inf-in-D-drive

To remove the Virus using CMD, type into your command prompt, attrib -r -a -s -h *.* and press Enter. This removes the read only, archive, system and hidden file attribute from all the files. 

  • -r is for removing the read-only files
  • -a is for removing the archive file
  • -s is for removing the system file
  • -h is for removing the hidden file
  • *.* for all the files with all different types of file extensions 

attrib-command-to-remove-virus-using-cmd

To delete the virus, type del autorun.inf and Enter 

virus

  • Once you have pressed enter, that file should get deleted from the current drive. In case, you want to delete that file from a USB stick, then you can change your current drive to USB drive current drive in step 2 and follow the commands.
  • You can again type ‘attrib’ command to see if the deleted file exists or not. As seen above, it does not exist anymore in the D drive.
  • To remove other viruses with extensions such as ‘.ink’, ‘.exe’, just type Del *.ink or Del *.exe respectively to delete those suspicious files.

 


 

If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit : http://fossbytes.com

Three Unbelievably Tiny Computers

The market for a device that can easily replace the standard PC has taken a new approach to size. Don’t be fooled, you may be surprised when you find out what is hiding inside these small machines.

Zotac Zbox Sphere

This computer not only breaks the mold in terms of size, but shape. The Zbox is in fact, not a box, but a sphere. Simply twist the circular top and feast your eyes on the interior powerhouse of the computer. The top half of this tiny PC houses an Intel Core i5-42WP 300U motherboard and 4GB of memory. The back panel provides six USB ports, as well as an HDMI and DisplayPort. In addition, the Zbox includes a 802.11ac WiFi module and a spot for an Ethernet cable if preferred. This almost bowling ball like computer packs a serious punch in terms of creativity and power. WP 4

 

 

 

 

Intel Compute Stick

This tiny PC resembles a USB thumb drive, and has stirred massive attention since its release in early 2015. The Intel Compute Stick plugs into any monitWP 5or’s HDMI port, an added bonus for anyone working in tight spaces. Concerned about over heating? Fear not, this tiny machine has a fittingly tiny fan inside, ensuring fast performance without
overheating. Unfortunately the stick does not have an internal battery and thWP 6erefore must run off micro USB power at all times in order to function. What the Intel Compute Stick lacks in battery capabilities it makes up for with a quad-core 1.3GHz processor and 2GB of RAM, with micro SD support for up to 128GB of storage. That’s a lot of power crammed into 4.5 inches.

 

 

 

 

 

Mouse Box

The tiniest computer of the three is cleverly disguised as a computer mouse. The Mouse Box device contains a quad-core 1.4GHz ARM processor, a 128GB solid-state drive, and built-in b/g/n WiFi. The wireless image transfer module allows for easy visual transmitting in addition to the convenient micro HDMI port. The coolest part? Sticking with the mouse motif, the Mouse Box doesn’t need to be plugged in. The inductive charging mat doubles as a mousepad. Although the Mouse Box is not up for public release quite yet, they most certainly have our attention.  WP 8

WP 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about material presented in this blog post please visit:

http://www.geek.com/chips/the-11-tiniest-most-powerful-computers-your-money-can-buy-1627324/

New Samsung Galaxy Tab Unit – T-Mobile

T-Mobile’s has come out with their first Android tablet, the Samsung Galaxy Tab.  It is a good piece of hardware, but it doesn’t have enough great apps to be compelling.  It’s hard to compete with other units like it for a variety of reasons, I feel not having enough apps is the largest one.  The iPad makes it difficult to set itself aside from the others.  Sprint also has its own version that actually came out two weeks ago, but just last week had the chance to play with this version.  Both are part of the same line of device and make up the first true tablet competitors to the iPad. I will say this, this unit is sort of a new breed, because unlike the iPad, they’re truly small and light enough to be used on the go. In any case, they’re well built and worth watching, though they need more custom apps to be truly useful.  The Samsung Galaxy Tab is about $399-$599. After playing with the unit I feel that the speed is great, nice camera that takes good pictures, and overall great performance.

This unit has 16GB of internal storage plus a memory card slot and the T-Mobile’s 3G network is very fast and reliable which is key.  The Galaxy Tab can’t hit T-Mobile’s maximum HSPA+ speeds of 7Mbps, but its got a healthy 2Mbps on the Galaxy Tab’s HSPA 7.2 modem using the Ookla speed test app. The device also has 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi, and it had no trouble connecting to our WPA2 protected network. There’s no Wi-Fi sharing mode, though, but there’s a USB tethering mode.  Looking over the web reports it is documented that some people have achieved 7.0 hours of video playback time, with screen brightness set to automatic.  The battery life for the galaxy is shorter than the iPad’s battery life, but Apple’s tablet is larger, thus the larger battery.  The Galaxy Tab model runs on Android 2.2. But here’s the biggest problem with the Tab: there is currently one good app for Android tablets. It is the new Wall Street Journal app, and it’s just beautiful, with a ‘virtual newspaper’ look and feel that is far easier and more fun to read than, say, the New York Times’ or the AP’s list format.  It is reported that more apps are coming, but who really knows when that is happening.

Device Specifications
Screen Size- 7 inches
Storage Capacity- 16 GB
Dimensions- 7.48 x 4.74 x 0.7 inches
Weight- 13.4 oz
Networking Options- 802.11b, 802.11g, 802.11n, 3G
Email Access- Dedicated email app

Removable Disk Drives vs. DVDs and USB Drives as Archive and Backup Media

Removable Disk Drives vs. DVDs and USB Drives as Archive and Backup MediaThe benefits of using high-capacity removable disk cartridges are clear when compared to alternative media such as tapes, DVDs, and USB drives.  Rugged, removable disk media such as the Dell PowerVault RD1000 cartridges are very durable, built to withstand a fall from nearly one meter.  They are also small and lightweight and can be easily stored off-site for better disaster recovery protection.

The drives themselves, when ordered with a Dell server, add only about $200 to the cost.  External drives, which can be connected to any server or workstation via USB, are only about $30 more.  The removable disk drive cartridges are typically available in 160GB, 320GB, 500GB and 640GB native capacities.  With data compression, a cartridge can often backup twice that amount of data, or more.

An archived collection of disk cartridges takes considerably less shelf space than a similar amount of DVDs or CDs — it would take 36 standard DVDs to hold the volume of a single 320GB removable disk cartridge.  This solution is also easily expandable – if you outgrow the 320GB cartridges, for example, just start using 500GB cartridges.  There’s no need to buy a new drive, and you can still read the files archived on the smaller cartridges.

Combined with the backup software best suited to your needs – such as Symantec Backup Exec, Acronis Backup and Recovery, or the backup software native to Windows Server 2008 and Windows 7, removable disk cartridges provide easy-to-use backup and disaster recovery capabilities to protect files, as well as all user data to help provide faster restores and reduced downtime.