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U.S. unlocks iPhone in San Bernardino Case, without Apple’s Help

applefbiAccording to the New York Times, law enforcement has figured out a way to sidestep the encryption on the iPhone in the San Bernardino case, and they did it without the help of Apple. The U.S. Department of Justice has since dropped legal action against Apple as they no longer need their assistance. The government pushed relentlessly for Apple to help unlock the phone. They even went as far as to say that an Apple created encryption key was the only method for gathering the stored data on the smartphone. We now know this to not be the case.

Apple’s main concern with complying to the government’s cry for help came from an understandable viewpoint. Apple CEO, Tim Cook, said creating a backdoor for this specific case would lead to a slippery slope for future cases with encryption components.

As it turns out Apple is off the hook for the time being, thanks to Cellebrite, an Israeli security firm. This firm provides mobile forensic services and assisted the FBI in unlocking the smartphone.

Withdrawing from prosecution leaves many questions open ended for future encryption cases. Something tells me this won’t be the last time Apple and other private companies will be faced with a difficult decision to make. Should such companies be forced to aid in encryption breaking for law enforcement purposes, or only special cases? What guidelines should be made?

If you would like to educate yourself further about the information presented in this blog post please visit:

http://www.pcmag.com/news/343264/u-s-unlocks-iphone-ends-legal-action-against-apple