Tag : Wireless

Google Fiber seeks to test Super Fast Wireless

google-fiber

In 12 major cities, Google is planning to rely on wireless technology rather than fiber-optic cables, and requesting permission to test wireless in 24 U.S. cities. Google parent company, Alphabet, has also suspended Google Fiber gigabit speed projects in San Jose, California and Portland.

As of right now, Google Fiber has reached six metro areas, the first of which being Kansas City in 2012. This process has cost hundreds of millions of dollars, largely due to the digging up and putting back together of streets and private residences. Google Fiber has not released how many customers they have in Kansas City or any of the other six metro areas. The Google Fiber blog however continues to promote the service, with three new business internet plans, including the $250 a month for 1 Gbps upload and download speeds with no data caps. Those eligible for the three plans include small businesses in Charlotte, North Carolina, Provo Utah, Austin Texas, and Nashville Tennessee.

The prediction that Google Fiber will move to a wireless reliance rather than the fiber-optic cable, is no surprise to analysts comparing industry ISPs. ISPs have plans in place already to deploy smaller cellular equipment for shorter distances to connect homes and small business to the closest high-speed fiber-optic cable. The wireless link could be a short distance away however, perhaps less than 100 feet away from the building or street in question. Also on the market already are small outdoor devices that are “small cell” and called “picocells”, as small as a shoebox, and easily hung from a light post or pole.

AT&T Gigapower is reportedly superseding  Google Fiber in citywide fast internet fiber rollouts. Google reliance on wireless however, could significantly influence this report, matching At&T. The speed of deployment with wireless will certainly allow Google to move more easily into more cities, keeping Google Fiber competitive.

Gartner analyst, Bill Menezes, thinks that wireless with have a boatload of advantages for Google, including the speed at which it can be installed, because of the elimination of having to drop a cable line on premise. This most certainly makes sense, as the service provider can ship to the customer directly, the premise receiver and self installation software, cutting the need for on-site installation. Menezes relays that it will be crucial that Google test the effectiveness and speed of wireless technology. Reliance on wireless technology at a higher frequency will transit over a short distance and have poor in-building penetration, possibly leading to more outdoor antennas such as the shoe box sized picocells.

This past April Google began testing wireless connections in their first Google Fiber location, Kansas City, testing the 3.5 GHz spectrum. This test is believed to last 18 months.

Always keeping things interesting.

Fiber


 

To find the original post, and educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit : www.networkworld.com 

Wires can’t keep up with faster Wi-Fi

Gigabit Wi-Fi, or 802.11ac, has been slowly appearing in homes, buildings and public hotspots, but according to researchers at OpenSignal, gigabit is not delivering to smartphones and wiring is the culprit. In part with how wireless technology works, and the performance of the wired networks Wi-Fi needs to work, the smartphone reach is strained. Researchers found that the 802.11ac which is the latest and greatest in Wi-Fi capabilites, gives users an average of 32.4Mbps, more than double the speed of anything else on the market. In anticipation of even newer technology, this is actually a great deal slower than the 400Mbps that should be made available with newer versions not on the market, yet.

Researchers wanted to know what accounted for the hold up, as 32.4 and 400 have a great range between them. What has been noticed is that the built-in limitations of wireless are partly to blame, but rather that the speed of wire that is plugged into the access point is the real cause of slower speeds. As technology moves forward, Wi-Fi has surpassed wired networks in many places. However, the wired networks still remain, and if the data ultimately carries over 25Mbps cable broadband, that is basically as much as any user is going to get.

Ethernet is attempting to keep up as 802.11ac gets faster, with new LAN interfaces that can run 5Gbps. At the moment the pickings are slim, and getting 802.11ac with a smartphone is not the norm. In order to do so, a smartphone and wired network are necessary. Most of the time when a smartphone is using Wi-Fi it is on the older, slower, 802.11n. Currently, users in the United States were only on 802.11ac 7.9 percent of the time. wifi_80211ac


If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit: Newer Wi-Fi’s faster, but it needs a fast wire behind it

 

Use Apple Configurator to deploy iPhones and iPads

Apple’s Configurator tool allows you to configure and deploy up to 30 iOS devices at a time.  The free app allows you to configure settings like Wi-fi and Exchange ActiveSync, and well as restrict access to features like the webcam and even internet browsing.

 

Apple support: http://help.apple.com/configurator/mac/1.0/#cadf1802aed

Download here:  http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/apple-configurator/id434433123?mt=12

Near Field Communication (NFC)

Something promising that i read up on recently was the concept of Near Field Communication. Essentially near field communication or NFC for short, consists of a close-range radio chip that is in your phone or other personal electronic devices and it will allow you to access different devices or rooms based on the settings. The current interesting use is for turning your cell phone into a key for a hotel, or a key-card lock. Personally I would love to just walk up to my house or hotel room and put my phone in front of the door which would allow me to access my room. Consolidating everything into one would be a great accomplishment.

This could also be potentially used for a variety of things. It wouldn’t necessarily have to be put into a cell phone but it could be in other devices as well. Maybe a car key or something of that nature. The nice thing is that they can be reprogrammed for anything.

If you lose your device, your access can easily be revoked through the management system. It is currently being pioneered in Sweden by a lock maker company Assa Abloy.

I think this is pretty neat and would love to see it in action.

WiFi – Secure? Think Again!

When it comes to WiFi, most would claim their network is secure and that there is little to worry about when it comes to someone in your neighborhood breaking into your network, but what happens when you combine a PogoPlug, 8gb of flash storage, some WiFi & GPS Radio’s, and a case or enclosure to hide all of that? You get the F-BOMB (Falling or Ballistically-launched Object that Makes Backdoors), Created by Brendan O’Connor and funded by DARPA, it’s a battery-powered device that cost’s a mere $50, and once it’s in range of a wireless network, this home-brewed Linux based device can crack into your WiFi network and upload it’s findings to a server, making it a device remotely accessible for further mischief. We here at BVA strongly suggest taking every precaution available for protecting your home-networks and business networks which includes the use of certificates, mac filtering, and even enterprise protocol’s.

Buffalo Wireless-N Dual Band Ethernet Converter

I recently had the opportunity to test out the Buffalo Wireless-N Dual Band Ethernet Converter and I was impressed with its relative ease of use. Basically what the device does is it picks up your wireless signal and converts it to a physical connections. It allows you to physically connect devices to the network where there are no Ethernet connections. It is a relatively small device with 4 Ethernet ports on the back. It comes with an installation CD and a network cable.

I found this device rather easy to setup. All I had to do was plug it in, connect the cable, and install the software on my PC. The software is very light weight and quite simple. It allows you to pick which connection you want to use and in my case I used the physical connection. I set the device just for testing purposes to acquire an IP address automatically. The device will automatically scan for wireless networks. You just need to choose your network provide the device with your security settings (SSID, security type, passcode).

After doing all of the above, I saved the settings and restarted the device and my internet was running through the device and allowing my laptop to have internet access. This is perfect for devices that are not close to Ethernet ports including gaming consoles, printers, media players, IP Phones, and more. I would definitely use this at my own house, therefore I would recommend it to others. Check it out for yourself.

Cheap and Reliable Wireless Solution

Here in recent months bva has been asked by more than one client for a reliable wireless solution that can cover an internal and external office area.  There are several great products out there that are perfect but also become very expensive and can really rack up the cost after software, routers, and access points are purchased.  It really ends up being a very complex system that requires a server and management.  Of course that is one more unit to manage and patch, which can be painful.  bva‘s goal here is to make things easier and reduce management time if possible.  That being said we went out and tried to find a product that was hard-coded which was an appliance that really allows for easy management that is cost effective.  This solution is under $700 which gets you a router and two external/internal wireless access points.  This unit also comes with an easy GUI interface that allows easy management and control which is huge.  It is important to perform an assessment that addresses the following questions:

  • do you understand the architecture of the building; angles; materials (sheet-rock, block, metal, etc)?
  • needed access point frequency?
  • coverage area per square feet inside and outside areas?
  • physical limitations/other signals present?
  • what is power options for the proposed area?
  • connectivity for the AP locations needed to occupy?
  • do you have POE switches in that area or will each Access Point need it’s own power?

iPad Can Be Used With Verizon Wireless

Verizon and Apple seem to be having problems about getting the iPhone on its network and being able to sell it.  It’s pretty funny that as a result, the carrier is getting the iPad instead. Apple and Verizon Wireless today announced that the Apple iPad will be available in more than 2,000 Verizon Wireless retail stores starting October 28.

AT&T still has the exclusive contract with Apple and of course someone got really creative with how to make this happen.  Verizon Wireless will not sell the iPad (Wi-Fi + 3G), the version of the tablet that runs on AT&T’s 3G network, it will instead sell the Wi-Fi-only iPad with its own Verizon MiFi 2200 Intelligent Mobile Hotspot.

The iPad will be available in three bundles:
•Apple iPad 16GB + MiFi: $629.99
•Apple iPad 32GB + MiFi: $729.99
•Apple iPad 64GB + MiFi: $829.99
As far as data plans for the iPad, Verizon will offer one: Up to 1GB of data for $20 per month.

Verizon’s bundle prices are the same as what you’d pay for the iPad with integrated AT&T 3G. But Apple and AT&T offer a choice of two service plans: 250MB a month for $14.99 or 2GB month for $25.
Incidentally, AT&T today also announced that it would begin selling the Wi-Fi + 3G iPad in its retail stores on the same day: October 28.
The upside to buying an iPad from Verizon? Versatility: The MiFi provides Internet access for up to five devices at a range of about 30 to 40 feet. But it is one more thing to tote along with you, though the MiFi is only about the size of a pack of cigarettes, but half as thick (3.5 by 2.3 by 0.4 inches).

It’s also one more thing you need to keep charged. Battery life varies depending on how many devices you have connected at once. In our tests, with four Wi-Fi connections, the battery dropped to one bar in an hour. In 90 minutes, it was almost fully drained. On the other hand, we were able to eke out 8 hours and 5 minutes of power on the iPad (Wi-Fi + 3G) running the 3G modem nonstop.  Lots of things to consider I suppose but it seems that this offering is a bit premature and not as seamless as it should be.