Tag : two-factor authentication

Two Factor Authentication – What is it?

two factor authentication

Two Factor Authentication, or 2FA, takes a combination of generally accepted forms of authentication to further secure your login to big sites and applications such as Facebook, Microsoft, Google, Apple iCloud and others. This is an extra layer of protection that utilizes something you know such as a password, and something only you has, such as a cell phone or fingerprint. This is not necessarily a new idea, many of us use this everyday when making purchases with a credit card and asked to enter a zip code for verification.

There are 3 generally accepted factors of authentication:

  1. Something you know – such as a password

  2. Something you have – such as a hardware token like a cell phone

  3. Something you are – such as your fingerprint

Two Factor Authentication takes two of the above in order to secure your log in. Such that if you have 2FA enabled on Facebook for instance, when you attempt to log into Facebook on a new device or browser you will be asked to confirm this log in with a second form of authentication which can be any of the three described above.

This form of authenticating is especially advised for sites and applications that house your personal information, credit cards, location information, are tied to other accounts, and could otherwise affect your personal life such as email, social media – the list is endless!

A few big names have taken head to this advice by employing 2FA, although the process is not entirely seamless, great strides have been taken to make using 2FA as easy as possible. Look for 2FA on your favorite big name sites and applications.

Set up Google 2FA here 

Set up Apple 2FA here 

Set up Microsoft 2FA here


 

If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit :

Can entering a password be as easy as taking a selfie?

Most of us have heard of two-factor authentication, but photo login? This is an entirely new concept. Cloud-based security solution, LogMeOnce, has released PasswordLess PhotoLogin which allows users to sign into any website, just like one would expect from any password manager, but with a photo!

Two-factor authentication is a preferred extra layer of security that uses a password and username in combination with something that only the user has on them such as a a piece of information only the user knows or a physical token. With PhotoLogin, this second piece of information is a photo, taken on the desktop and then approved or denied via a trusted mobile device to gain access. So rather than a code being sent to your mobile device, the photo serves as the code.

When you click the PhotoLogin icon on the LogMeOnce home screen, you are prompted to snap a picture of yourself, or really anything you would like, even a stapler or your dog. The photo is then automatically sent to your linked mobile device where you can verify the image. The true protectors can swipe left and see data such as IP address, GPS location, and time stamp. Photos expire in 60 seconds and will self destruct after the first use, which ensures that you photo password is always unique. The LogMeOnce PhotoLogin update is free and available on Chrome, Firefox, Safari, as well as iOS and Android.

507574-logmeonce-photologin

 


 

If you would like to learn more about the material presented in this blog post, please visit: LogMeOnce Password Manager Adds Photo Login

 

 

Single sign-on for to the Cloud

Single sign-on for to the Cloud

Screen Shot 2014-10-28 at 12.30.04 PM

Have the ability of signing in once for all web-based applications is valuable.  All we have is passwords for everything, email, personal and business applications, document shares…. The number of Web services will only increase, and keeping them all straight and secure things s only going to get worse. Trying to manage all these individual passwords is a major problem for security. Many end users cope by re-using their passwords, which exposes all sorts of security holes. One solution is a single sign-on (SSO) tool to automate the logins of enterprise applications and also beef up password complexity, without taxing end users to try to remember dozens of different logins. What is exciting is that there are several products now combine both cloud-based software as a service logins with local desktop Windows logins, and add improved two-factor authentication and smoother federated identity integration.