Tag : store

Establish Standards for Cloud Computing

Cloud computing is the latest hot trend in the IT world and among technology consulting companies.  To a point where almost every meeting I go on talks about this subject matter and does so in a very misinformed way.  The perception out in the marketplace is that the cloud is cheaper, more reliable, and secure.  That is simply just not the case unless the proper steps and procedures are followed.  When will we see cloud standards?  That is a really great question because the security questions of encryption and penetration capability still have not been addressed.  How reliable is the data in the cloud?

The protocol, data format and program-interface standards for using cloud services are mostly in place, which is why the market has been able to grow so fast. But standards for configuration and management of cloud services are not here yet. The crucial  standards for practices, methods and conceptual architecture are still evolving and we are nowhere close.  Cloud computing will not reach its full potential until the management and architectural standards are fully developed and stable. Until these standards are formalized and agreed upon there will be pitfalls and mishaps, which cannot take place.

The main premise of Cloud protocol is  TCP/IP.  The cloud usually uses established standard Web and Web Service data formats and protocols. When it comes to configuration and management, the lack of effective, widely accepted standards is beginning to be felt and I have seen the negative results.  There are several agencies and organizations working on cloud configuration and management standards, including the Distributed Management Task Force (www.dmtf.org), the Open Grid Forum (www.ogf.org), and the Storage Networking Industry Association (www.snia.org).

Currently there are, as of yet, no widely accepted frameworks to assist the integration of cloud services into enterprise architectures.   An area of concern is the possibility of changing cloud suppliers. You should have an exit strategy before finding a provider and signing a cloud contract. There’s no point in insisting that you own the data and can remove it from the provider’s systems at any time if you have nowhere else to store the data, and no other systems to support your business.

When selecting an enterprise cloud computing provider, its architecture should have the following:

• the cloud services form a stable, reliable component of the architecture for the long term;
• they are integrated with each other and with the IT systems operated by the enterprise; and
• they support the business operations effectively and efficiently.

Other groups that are looking to establish industry standards include the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (http://csrc.nist.gov), the Object Management Group (www.omg.org) and the Organization for Advancement of Structured Information Systems (www.oasis-open.org).

Microsoft Exchange Cloud Offering Has Limitations – BPOS

BVA has seen a lot of ups and downs with the Microsoft in-the-cloud offering with Exchange.  We have been a BPOS partner for over two years with great success overall but have run into some small and large problems that we want to disclose.  One of the biggest problems with the offering is that Microsoft does not backup the mail data over 14 days through an OST locally on the users hard drive as well as one in the Cloud Store.  Another problem is the sub-folder size and being extremely careful with the deletion process with those sub-folders.  Meaning in one scenario, a client deleted a sub-folder that was greater than 2GB in size and as a result deleted it from the OST for recovery.  There is an outlook rule where it states that any sub-folder deleted that is over the size of 3GB will not go to the recycling bin but rather delete completely off the store.  There is no way to restore the the file from the cloud or the local OST which can be quite painful.  This has been verified with Microsoft and they really do not have a good reason of why this is the case.  Microsoft’s suggestion is to purchase an additional service called Email Archiving for an additional $4.25.  The cost for some of the BPOS offerings are as followed:

Technical Support (All Break Fix issues, Partner Care questions and routing)

BPOS Technical Support

Available to customers and  partners who  are acting on behalf of their BPOS customers

1-866-MSONLINE, 1-866-441-8425, (425)-704-4614

https://admin.microsoftonline.com/login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fDefault.aspx 23

http:/www.microsoft.com/online/default.mspx