Tag : reliable

The New Wifi – 1GB Throughput

Over the last few years bva has had to support many different types of wifi with many several different users expectations of speeds.  Obviously the two most popular over the last 10 years have been G and N.  There are many types of wireless routers and access points out there that have finally become stable and reliable.  About two months ago bva got visibility into a new type of wifi called 802.11ac where we were able to test and see with our own eyes what it could do.  This new wireless on the 5 GHz band and see’s LAN throughput of at least 1 gigabit per second with a maximum single link throughput of at least 500 megabits per second (500 Mbit/s).

This is a great product for users that want to replicate data or obviously have high speed bandwidth.  Having a GB connection via wireless to the internal servers is something that I would thought we would not see this quickly so we here at bva are quite impressed.

 

Dual-band Linksys EA6500

 

 

 

 

 

Back View

 

 

 

 

 

Side View

 

 

Cheap and Reliable Wireless Solution

Here in recent months bva has been asked by more than one client for a reliable wireless solution that can cover an internal and external office area.  There are several great products out there that are perfect but also become very expensive and can really rack up the cost after software, routers, and access points are purchased.  It really ends up being a very complex system that requires a server and management.  Of course that is one more unit to manage and patch, which can be painful.  bva‘s goal here is to make things easier and reduce management time if possible.  That being said we went out and tried to find a product that was hard-coded which was an appliance that really allows for easy management that is cost effective.  This solution is under $700 which gets you a router and two external/internal wireless access points.  This unit also comes with an easy GUI interface that allows easy management and control which is huge.  It is important to perform an assessment that addresses the following questions:

  • do you understand the architecture of the building; angles; materials (sheet-rock, block, metal, etc)?
  • needed access point frequency?
  • coverage area per square feet inside and outside areas?
  • physical limitations/other signals present?
  • what is power options for the proposed area?
  • connectivity for the AP locations needed to occupy?
  • do you have POE switches in that area or will each Access Point need it’s own power?

Establish Standards for Cloud Computing

Cloud computing is the latest hot trend in the IT world and among technology consulting companies.  To a point where almost every meeting I go on talks about this subject matter and does so in a very misinformed way.  The perception out in the marketplace is that the cloud is cheaper, more reliable, and secure.  That is simply just not the case unless the proper steps and procedures are followed.  When will we see cloud standards?  That is a really great question because the security questions of encryption and penetration capability still have not been addressed.  How reliable is the data in the cloud?

The protocol, data format and program-interface standards for using cloud services are mostly in place, which is why the market has been able to grow so fast. But standards for configuration and management of cloud services are not here yet. The crucial  standards for practices, methods and conceptual architecture are still evolving and we are nowhere close.  Cloud computing will not reach its full potential until the management and architectural standards are fully developed and stable. Until these standards are formalized and agreed upon there will be pitfalls and mishaps, which cannot take place.

The main premise of Cloud protocol is  TCP/IP.  The cloud usually uses established standard Web and Web Service data formats and protocols. When it comes to configuration and management, the lack of effective, widely accepted standards is beginning to be felt and I have seen the negative results.  There are several agencies and organizations working on cloud configuration and management standards, including the Distributed Management Task Force (www.dmtf.org), the Open Grid Forum (www.ogf.org), and the Storage Networking Industry Association (www.snia.org).

Currently there are, as of yet, no widely accepted frameworks to assist the integration of cloud services into enterprise architectures.   An area of concern is the possibility of changing cloud suppliers. You should have an exit strategy before finding a provider and signing a cloud contract. There’s no point in insisting that you own the data and can remove it from the provider’s systems at any time if you have nowhere else to store the data, and no other systems to support your business.

When selecting an enterprise cloud computing provider, its architecture should have the following:

• the cloud services form a stable, reliable component of the architecture for the long term;
• they are integrated with each other and with the IT systems operated by the enterprise; and
• they support the business operations effectively and efficiently.

Other groups that are looking to establish industry standards include the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (http://csrc.nist.gov), the Object Management Group (www.omg.org) and the Organization for Advancement of Structured Information Systems (www.oasis-open.org).