Tag : Office

Chrome Extension Opens Microsoft Office Docs In the browser window

For those of you users out there who are running Google Chrome beta, there is a beta extension in existence called Chrome Office Viewer that will actually let you open Microsoft Office documents in Chrome. Currently this is a read only extension but hopefully soon it will be a full blown read/write add-in. It has the potential to be a big plug-in. It is also important to note that when opening documents in chrome, it opens it up in a sandbox mode. Essentially separating it from everything else to prevent infections if the file is malicious. Pretty cool if you ask me.

Office 365 Will Include 2013 Product Versions- Exchange, SharePoint, Lync, and Office

The Office 365 update that includes the 2013 product versions of Exchange, SharePoint, Lync, and Office will be available February 27th.  This is a fundamental shift in our business that began several years ago and continues today with the release of Office 365 Home Premium. This is a brand new Office never experienced before.  For the first time, consumers can subscribe to Office as a service instead of purchasing Office as a piece of software to install. The new Office subscription is an entirely new way to think about the productivity experience with entirely new benefits.

Office 365 Home Premium subscribers receive all the full-featured Office applications they know and love, together with impressive new cloud and social benefits built in. One subscription can run the service on up to five devices, all for just $99.99 a year. People will love instant access to all their documents and settings across their devices and how Office takes full advantage of the new Windows 8 touch interface. They’ll love staying connected to the people and information they care about. And they’ll love having the latest version of Office at all times because it simply updates without the hassle of purchasing and upgrading to a new version.   Smaller businesses are also choosing Office 365 at a rapid pace, with a 150 percent increase in the number of small and medium-sized businesses using the service over the past 12 months. These businesses will get to enjoy the new Office 365 service for businesses beginning Feb. 27.

Adding Public Folder Calendars to Your Outlook Profile

Here is a simple walk through on how to add public calendars to your outlook profile.

Within your outlook, go to the bottom left corner and click on the Folder List button (figure A). This will bring up additional folders that you do not normally see (Figure B).

If you expand public folders, you will see all of the public folders for your organization. These are all hosted on the Exchange server. If you would like to add a calendar to your profile you would browse down to the calendar and add it to your favorites.

In this case, you would expand Public Folders > All Public Folders > Calendars. Inside the calendars folder is the list of available calendars. Right click the calendar you want and select add to favorites. You will see the ‘add to favorites’ dialogue, and you just click add.

Once you have added the calendar to your favorites, you should be able to go to your calendars and the calendar you just added to your favorites should be listed under “other calendars.”

You should be able to repeat this process for any other public folder calendars that you want to add to your outlook profile.

MAC Microsoft Office 2011- Finally Got it Right

It feels like I have been waiting forever for the new release of Office for the Mac.  With Microsoft Office for the Mac 2011 (Home and Student version, $119; Home and Business version, $149), Microsoft has finally gotten it right. After a string of disappointing releases, the new Mac version of the world’s most widely-used office suite is a spectacular success, and an unexpected triumph for Microsoft’s Macintosh group. Compared with Office for the Mac 2008 and its predecessors, Office 2011 is innovative, better-designed, startlingly faster, vastly more powerful, and far more compatible with Office for Windows. It even includes a few features that outclass anything in its Windows-based counterpart, Microsoft Office 2010 ($499, 4 stars). If you’re a casual, light-duty office-suite user or a student, iWork ’09 ($79, 4 stars) is still a great option, but if you’ve got heavy-duty work to perform on the Mac, you’ll want Office for the Mac 2011.  The cost for the suite is pretty reasonable for the applications you get.

Office for the Mac still has some minor weaknesses, and at least one feature that’s less powerful than in the previous version—Office no longer syncs calendars with iCal. Overall, it’s the best office suite ever for using the Mac as a serious platform for getting work done.  Office for the Mac comes in two versions, a Home and Student Version (single user package, $119; three-user family package $149) and a Home and Business Version (single user package, $199; licensed for two machines, $279). The Home and Student version includes Word 2011, Excel 2011, PowerPoint 2011. The Home and Business version matches the Home and Student version plus Outlook 2011, which replaces the Entourage mail, calendar, and contact manager app in recent versions.

Pros: Fast, flexible office application suite. Most powerful Mac office software. Highly compatible with Office for Windows. Well-integrated with OS X. Visual Basic for Applications recorded and programmed macros fully supported. Newly-designed Outlook replaces Entourage as mail/calendar/contact app.
Cons: No calendar synching with iCal. Outlook won’t synch with or retrieve mail from Exchange Server 2003 or earlier.
Bottom Line: Office for the Mac roars back with fast, powerful application suite the best of its kind for the OS X platform.

MS Project 2010 compatibility issue with older versions

I recently received a request from a user where they were having issues opening a Microsoft Project file and I thought I would share my findings. It’s not that it is so much a complex or difficult issue as it is a frustrating one, and shows you how sometimes people get a sour taste in their mouth about Microsoft.

The issue started when the user received a MS project file and tried opening it with MS Project 2007 which we have installed on our terminal servers. Project threw an error saying that this file was created in a new version and that we could download the converter in order to make it work. Well here is where the issue comes in. When we went to the link with the recommended fix, it took us to a site where we could download MS Project 2003 SP3 which contains a converter tool. I thought really?? Why would I install a service pack for an older version that does not even exist on my system?

Apparently the only converter tool available for Project 2007 is to open and convert Project 2003 files, which is rather annoying because you would think a compatibility patch or something would have been released when Project 2010 was. Probably asking too much right?

The funny part of the whole situation is the actual solution Microsoft proposes on the Project 2010 website (see below).

Now wouldn’t it just be easier to ask the sender to save it as an older version?