Tag : cisco

Cisco PIX firewall and IOS software security vulnerabilities

security

Cisco has released reports that a high priority security hole in its IOS software could have allowed hackers access to memory contents, and therefore confidential information, from more than one product in their lineup.

Cisco has pinpointed cause of the vulnerability to  “insufficient condition checks in the part of the code that handles [Internet Key Exchange] IKEv1 security negotiation requests. An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by sending a crafted IKEv1 packet to an affected device configured to accept IKEv1 security negotiation requests.”

Network World 

IKEv1 is used in VPN applications such as LAN-to-LAN VPN, remote access VPN, Dynamic Multipoint VPN, and Group Doman of Interpretation. To address the vulnerability Cisco plans to release software updates and currently there is no workaround available.

The list of Cisco products is as follows:

  • Cisco IOS XR Software versions 4.3.x through 5.2.x.  are affected

  • Cisco IOS XR Software released 5.3.x and newer are not affected

  • PIX versions 6.x and prior are affected

  • PIX versions 7.0 and after are unaffected

Back in August Cisco was alerted to information posted on the internet that had been exploited from firewall products from multiple vendors. The potential for exploitation of Cisco PIX firewalls was considered, and Cisco began an investigation into reports of the “BENIGNCERTAIN” exploit.


If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit: www.networkworld.com 

 

Cisco Firewall flaw allows hackers to take control of devices

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Recent headlines this week reported that three models of Cisco wireless VPN firewalls and routers from the small business RV series contain a critical unpatched vulnerability that hackers can use to take control over devices. In the Web-based management interface of the Cisco RV110W Wireless-N VPN Firewall, RV130W Wireless-N Multifunction VPN Router and RV215W Wireless-N VPN Router, you’ll find the vulnerability. Attackers only need to send an unauthenticated HTTP request with custom user data and the vulnerability can easily be exploited if the devices are configured for remote management.

Unfortunately this is not the only unpatched vulnerability within the three Cisco models, the company also warns of a cross-site scripting (XSS) flaw as well as two buffer overflows that could risk denial-of-service conditions. Exploiting the buffer overflows  requires attackers to have an authenticated session in the devices’s Wed-based interface. But the XSS flaw is easily triggered by tricking authenticated users to click on malicious URLs. Successful exploit allows attackers to acess sensitive browser-based information. The XSS flaw, because it can be combined with other vulnerabilities, makes it difficult for users to find a mitigation strategy without patches. If users were to disable external management in their devices in an attempt to protect themselves from this vulnerability, the devices will still be exposed through the cross-site scripting flaw.

Unfortunately, no patches are available for any of the 3 security flaws. Cisco plans to release firmware updates that will address the latest flaws sometimes within the third quarter of 2016.

 

 

 


 

If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit: Flaws expose Cisco small-business routers, firewalls to hacking

Setting up VPN On Your iPad/iPhone

If you are interested in setting up a Cisco IPSec VPN connection on your iPad, I have detailed some instructions on doing so.

  1. On the iPad itself, go to Settings > General > Network >VPN > Add VPN Configuration.
  2. On the tabs listed, select the IPSec tab from the connection types. Note that  you see a Cisco logo present here.
  3. Now you can enter you information as provided by your network admin:
    • Description: “Work VPN” (this can be whatever you would like)
    • Server: vpn.mydomain.com (ask your IT administrator if you are not sure)
    • Account: Your network login account
    • Password: Your network login password
    • Group Name: myvpn (ask network admin
    • Secret: ******* (once again ask your network admin)

4. Now you should be able to click save up in the corner and we are almost there.

5. You should now be able to go into Settings > General > Network > VPN  and slide the VPN switch to on. Once connected, you can use your favorite RDP client and remote your network PCs.

 

Fix Cached Credentials over VPN

Ever had a remote user who uses a laptop outside of the company network and their cached credentials somehow do not work or have been lost from the cache? I recently faced this same issue and with a little advice from a colleague, I was able to successfully get the users credentials cached once again.

The way I was able to accomplish this was the fact that we had VPN setup, and since most companies have some sort of VPN for their users to access email and documents, we were able to use this to our advantage.

Essentially what I did was log onto the computer using the administrator cached credentials. Once in there I made sure the VPN connection was setup to point to my server at the main office, and I went ahead and logged in. Once in, I used a random application on the desktop (I think I used firefox), I right-clicked, and selected the run as option. When the dialogue came up, I used the end users credentials rather than my own. What this does is it will try to validate the user credentials with the domain controller because we are connected through the VPN.

Once this is done and the application opens, you can disconnect from the VPN, log off of the administrator account, and try logging on with the end user.

I was successful in my attempt and I hope you are too!