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Undetected Hacker Group Spying Since 2011…

Russia

Strider hackers reference the all-seeing eye of Sauron in their ‘nation-state level’ malware, which has been used to steal files from organisations across the globe. Unknown hacker group, ‘Strider’, has just been discovered by cyber-security researchers at Symantec. Strider hackers are referencing the all-seeing eye of Sauron in the groups ‘nation-state level’ malware in use currently to steal files from organisations all over the world. Apparently the group has aimed their malware at those that would be of potential interest to a nation state’s intelligence services.  The Remsec malware is mainly targeting organisations in Russia, however the group has infected airline systems in China, an embassy in Belgium, and a large organisation in Sweden, who’s name could not be confirmed. The malware in use is designed to infect a system and open a backdoor where it logs keystrokes and steals files.

 

The malware has been in operation since October 2011, but avoided detection by the majority of antivirus systems for nearly five years. Only 36 infections have been reported in these five years, but the nature and capability of the malware in terms of stealth and detection is rather unsettling. Components that make up Remsec are built as “BLOBs”, which stands for Binary Large Object, collections of binary data which are often difficult for antivirus security software to detect. The malware is deployed across a network rather than stored on a disk, which makes it increasingly had to detect.

A deeper look in the modules of the malware found the modules are written in the Lua programming language. This embedded scripting language is used to perform various functions and processes. In the case of Remsec, these functions include key logging and the code that contains references to the all-seeing eye of Sauron from the Lord of the Rings. The use of Lua modules leads security researchers to believe that Strider may have connections to the Flamer hacking group, known for using this type of programming in it’s malware. Another lead could be the connection the the infamous Regin malware. One of the victims of the Remsec malware had also been the victim of Regin malware. That poor machine!

 

The nature of the malware, combined with the coding and programming, leads security researcher to believe that the Strider group are highly proficient technically in the development of malicious software, and very well could escalate to a nation-state level attacker.

 

 

 

 


 

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