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5 Ways to Spy a Hacker in Your Network

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1. Search for the telltale signs of a breach. 

Port Scans? Excessive failed log-ins? When a hacker infiltrates an unfamiliar network they need to learn the topology of the network, looking for vulnerable points of access in servers. From this point they can pinpoint administrative users and data stores.

2. Look for a “normal” user performing administrative tasks.¬†

By using native tools on computers and servers, hackers can stay under the radar for much longer than if they were to use known attack tools. Anti-virus software should pick up on malware and attack tools, but not normal administrative tools. Determining who the admins with the organization are can significantly lessen the worry. Active Directory aids in establishing user roles and privileges with which you can then use to see the applications and devices used by administrators or that are managed by administrators. Awareness about what the administrators within the organization are using, should make it easier to spot when an attacker is looming in the background. ¬†If a hacker takes control of a administrator machine and begins performing tasks, you’ll be able to identify if this is normal or suspect activity.

3. Look for a device using multiple accounts and credentials to access network resources. 

Hackers, both internally and externally, generally steal user account information or generate fake accounts in order to gain access to the network. In order to spy indicative markers of of attack activity, analyze credential usage. Make sure to monitor network traffic and analyze log from the authentication and authorization infrastructure in your network. Extract data and look carefully to see how many systems each user interacts with, and monitor abnormalities.

4. Look for an attacker trying to find valuable data in file servers. 

By figuring out what Windows file shares are accessible, attackers hunt for important data such as intellectual property and banking information, or once they find important data they will encrypt it and the rest is history. A valuable signal would be to spot abnormalities in file share access. This is a preventative measure for spotting both hackers and employees considering insider theft.

5. Look for the command and control activity or persistent access mechanisms. 

Keep an eye on outbound communication. Attackers need to be able to communicate between the Internet and endpoints they control within your network. There could be malware and Remote Access Trojans in your network, so be mindful of indications of malicious software phoning home.

 

 


 

If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit:Five signs an attacker is already in your network