Monthly Archives : January 2017

Android Trojan rerouters you to Rogue DNS server

android trojan

New Android Trojan virus reported by Kaspersky Lab, that goes by the name, Switcher.

Switcher Trojan infects wifi routers through an infected Android, where an attacker can then reroute other users on the network to malicious sites. This is through brute force attacks against the admin interface of the router – using a predetermined list of password/login combos. The DNS servers are then replaced with both an active and backup server of the hacker. This allows for a multitude of potential infections, since every DNS query is directed to a network controlled by the attacker.

Kaspersky Lab researchers explained that “the ability of the Switcher Trojan to hijack [DNS] gives the attackers almost complete control over network activity which uses the name-resolving system … the approach works because wireless routers generally reconfigure the DNS settings of all devices on the network to their own – thereby forcing everyone to use the same rogue DNS.” – www.techgenix.com

Attacks primarily in china and proven track record predicts that the attacks will certainly spread across locations. This is the first Android malware that has been used to attack routers in this manner.

At the moment it is advised that admins and users alike should be on the look out for the following rogue DNS servers:

101.200.147.153

112.33.13.11

120.76.249.59 

“A successful attack can be hard to detect and even harder to shift: the new settings can survive a router reboot, and even if the rogue DNS is disabled, the secondary DNS server is on hand to carry on,” says Kaspersky Lab cybersecurity researcher Nikita Buchka. – www.zdnet.com

 


If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit: www.techgenix.com

 

What/Why/How – you should always use a VPN

vpn

What is a VPN? A virtual private network creates a secure tunnel between two sites via the Internet to protect your privacy. This is usually a paid service to ensure web browsing is secure and private while using public wifi or less secure wifi networks.

What happens? Your PC connects to a VPN server, and then your web traffic passes back and forth through that server. This VPN server can be located anywhere in the world whether it be the United States or Thailand. Therefore when you are surfing the web, those websites you are visiting see you as browsing from that VPN server’s geographical location, not where your laptop is really located.

Why is that important? When you are hanging out on your laptop in a public space such as a coffee shop, perusing Amazon for some deals, hackers are far less likely to be able to steal your login credentials, your credit card information, email address, or direct you to a fake banking site or other spoof. Even your internet service provider will have a hard time trying to snoop on what websites you are visiting.

Free services are offered, but they are slow with considerably less bandwidth, so pay the $5 a month and get a service of quality. Ask questions such as what kind of logging does the VPN provider do? How long do they keep information about your VPN sessions? Are they going to be recording the IP addresses you use? Answers to these questions should be taken into consideration based on how much privacy you want and need.

 


If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit: www.networkworld.com

 

VR add-on to make Oculus and Vive headsets Wireless

vr

Atlanta based company KwikVR is confident they can deliver a wireless VR headset device that is capable with both the HTC Vive and the Oculus Rift.

The device is less than a pound and is attached to your belt. It features two USB ports and an HDMI port. The company reports that the device delivers low latency and “guaranteed native resolution”. It also delivers 5GHz Wi-Fi connectivity.

Price of the device has not yet been released. The Vive-compatible TPCast sells for around $220 a pop, so it is predicted that KwikVR could be priced similar. The KwikVR could stir up additional buzz since the TPCast is currently only available in China.

 


If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the material presented in this blog post please visit the source : www.mashable.com

 

Luggage Tag Code, Gives Identity and Flight Info to Hackers

gds

Researchers from German security company, Security Research Labs, recently revealed the poor security behind the current travel booking systems. Three of the largest Global Distributed Systems (GDS) handling flight reservations for worldwide travel are Amadeus, Sabre, and Travelport. These three systems handle 90 percent of flight reservations.

The poor security stems from these systems originating in the 70’s and 80’s and never being rebuilt, but rather integrated with the more modern web infrastructure of today.

Each traveler on a GDS is identified by a six-digit code that also serves as the booking code. This code houses all traveler information from home address, email address, phone numbers, credit card information, frequent flyer number and even the IP address used to make the booking online! This ID is printed on boarding passes and luggage tags.

A specific ID is not needed to find valid traveler information and airline websites and GDS do not limit the amount of times you can check for codes. This gives hackers the window to use brute force approach to finding valid codes for use.

Researchers explain that it is possible for a hacker to steal your flight by changing the flight information without your knowledge or canceling it and receiving a voucher, just from your ID printed on your luggage tag. A hacker could also take frequent flyer miles, or use the knowledge that you are on vacation for a potential phishing attack.


If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this post please visit: www.pcmag.com 

 

Say Hello To Intel’s Optane

capture

Hello Optane!

First Optane storage announced at CES in the low form of 16 GB and 32GB units to be used as cache, not primarily storage. It is anticipated that Optanes will gradually grow in densities and capacities over the next few years.

3D Xpoint is the technology that bases Optane. Memory cells sit in three-dimensional mesh. Intel and Micron cooperated together on the development of the technology. The first 16G and 32 GB storage will work only on PCs with Kaby Lake chips. New Optanes are exclusive to Kaby Lake and will not on PCs with older Intel chips like Skylake or Broadwell or on PCs with AMD chips.

Intel will eventually ship large-capacity Optane SSDs, replacing conventional SSDs and DRAM. Optane will also ship as a DRAM replacement that could plug into DIMM slots. Optane memory will be denser and retain data in comparison to DRAM, which deletes data once a PC is turned off. Intel claims Optane could be up to 10 times faster than conventional SSDs, making gaming, PC booting and productivity applications much much faster. However, no real world tests have been completed as of yet.

The large-capacity Optane SSDs will most likely be installed in servers before coming PCs. Facebook and IBM are already testing large-capacity SSDs in servers. Low-capacity Optane storage will ship in the second quarter of this year. The storage will initially go into sockets on motherboards. Eventually large capacity Optane storage will plug into m.2 slots or 2.5-inch slots.

3 Laptops that will have Optane

Lenovo’s ThinkPad T570 $909. Will have optional 16 GB PCle M.2 2242-S3 and is available in March even if Optane comes later.

HP’s new and improved Envy Curved All-in-One 34 with Kaby Lake. Will get Optane when updated in spring, and that is all the details we get.

Dell plans to install Optane in some of its Precision laptops and OptiPlex desktops around June. Intel’s new “tall” NUC systems — the NUC7i3BNH with 7th Generation Core i3, NUC7i5BNH with Core i5, and the NUC7i7BNH with Core i7 — will support Optane.

 


If you would like to educate yourself in more detail about the information presented in this blog post please visit: www.computerworld.com