Monthly Archives : September 2010

Fixing Backup Exec Advanced Open File Option VSS Snapshot errors

 

For several weeks, I had been receiving the error message below on most of my backup jobs for servers on my network.  The errors seemed to have started all of a sudden, and I want to share my research and troubleshooting steps that finally allowed me to resolve this frustrating problem.  There is a wealth of information out there about this error – some of it good, some of it not so much.  Hopefully this blog will help bring together the points that I found most helpful in my quest to find a resolution.

Backup- servername.DOMAIN.COM

– AOFO: Initialization failure on: “\servername.DOMAIN.COMShadow?Copy?Components”. Advanced Open File Option used: Microsoft Volume Shadow Copy Service (VSS).

V-79-10000-11231 – VSS Snapshot error. Activity on a volume is preventing all volumes from being snapped. Try selecting the option ‘Process logical volumes for backup, one at a time’ , and then run the job again.

 

First things first, I started with the recommendations given to me in the error message.  To reconfigure our backup job to “Process logical volumes for backup, one at a time”, see this Support Document from Symantec: http://www.symantec.com/business/support/index?page=content&id=TECH69327&actp=search&viewlocale=en_US&searchid=1285083683731

Also, since the error specifically states that activity on the volume being backed up is preventing the snapshot from occurring, I did several things to quiet disk activity during the backup.  Here are a few things that I found that may have contributed to excessive disk activity on my servers:

  • Scheduled tasks that run during the backup
  • SQL Server Maintenance plans that run during the backup
  • Microsoft Indexing Service and Microsoft Search (If your server is a file server or Sharepoint server, this can be useful, otherwise, I would think that these services should be disabled)
  • Anti-Virus scheduled scans that may run during the backup
  • Defrag jobs scheduled during the backup (more on this later)

 Here are some other general tips that I found useful in ensuring my servers were optimally configured so that VSS snapshots can run successfully:

  • Free up disk space.  Having a low amount of free space can cause issues with VSS, backups, and system performance.  Here are some tips for freeing up space on the C drive:
  • Delete temp files in temp, WindowsTemp and your profile temp, which you can find by typing %temp% in the Run dialog and clicking OK.  
  • Check your log files in Windowssystem32LogFiles, as IIS can be reconfigured to start logging to a drive with more space.
  • NTUninstall folders in your Windows folder can be moved to another drive, or deleted.  However, you cannot uninstall updates once you do this. 
  • Many times, the WindowsSoftwareDistribution folder will get very large from cached Windows Updates.  You can safely delete this folder by stopping the “Background Intelligent Transfer Service” and the “Automatic Updates” services, deleting the folder, and restarting those services. 
  • Another place on your C drive that will sometimes grow very large is the WindowsInstaller folder.  If you download the Windows 2003 Support Tools, you can run msizap.exe –G to remove any orphaned patch files that live in the WindowsInstaller folder.
  • Once you free up disk space, you should defrag your volumes.  If you have off-hours where your server is not heavily used and you can schedule defrag jobs, I would highly recommend doing so.  I have found several references out there on the Internet that indicate a highly fragmented file system can cause VSS errors.  At the beginning of my quest to resolve this problem, I discovered that many of my volumes were highly fragmented.  I now have scheduled defrag jobs that run (outside of my backup window, of course!)
  • Make sure that you are up to date on all Microsoft Windows Updates and Service Packs.
  • Run Live Update to install all updates for Backup Exec.  Ensure that you are running all of the latest Service Packs (currently SP4 for Backup Exec 12.5) and Hotfixes.

Please note that after installation of Backup Exec Service Packs and some Hotfixes, it is necessary to update the Backup Exec Remote Agents on your remote servers.  You can redeploy those agents from within Backup Exec the same way you installed them originally – by going to Tools, and then selecting “Install Agents and Media Servers on Other Servers”.  Should that fail (as several of mine did), you can navigate to Program FilesSymantecBackup ExecAgents on your media server and copy the folder of the Windows agent for your server architecture – RAWS32 for 32-bit servers, and RAWSX64 for 64-bit servers to the remote server.  Then on the remote server, execute the setupaa.cmd to update your agent.  A reboot will likely be required.

Microsoft has released a VSS Update Rollup that addresses multiple VSS issues.   If you have the netdiag.exe tool installed from the Windows Server 2003 Support Tools, you can quickly find out if you have this update applied by typing netdiag | find “940349”.   If there is no output from the command, or it does not show v3 of this update, then you should download and apply this update.  This should be done on all servers being backed up, and this will also require a reboot on each server.  Information and a link to download the update are found here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/940349

It can also be helpful to reregister the DLL files required for Microsoft Volume Shadow Copy.  I have included a sample batch file that can help reregister those files.

Cut and paste the following into notepad, and save it as FIXVSS03.BAT.  Run FIXVSS03.BAT to reset VSS configuration.

——begin cut here——

rem FILENAME: FIXVSS03.BAT
rem
net stop “System Event Notification”
net stop “COM+ Event System”
net stop “Microsoft Software Shadow Copy Provider ”
net stop “Volume Shadow Copy”
cd /d %windir%system32
net stop vss
net stop swprv
regsvr32 /s ole32.dll
regsvr32 /s oleaut32.dll
regsvr32 /s vss_ps.dll
vssvc /register
regsvr32 /s /i swprv.dll
regsvr32 /s /i eventcls.dll
regsvr32 /s es.dll
regsvr32 /s stdprov.dll
regsvr32 /s vssui.dll
regsvr32 /s msxml.dll
regsvr32 /s msxml3.dll
regsvr32 /s msxml4.dll
Cd /d %systemroot%syswow64
regsvr32 /s ole32.dll
regsvr32 /s vss_ps.dll
regsvr32 /s es.dll
regsvr32 /s stdprov.dll
regsvr32 /s msxml3.dll
regsvr32 /s msxml.dll
regsvr32 /s msxml4.dll
net start “COM+ Event System”

—–End Cut Here—–

Note: The syswow64 folder will not exist on 32-bit Windows 2003 servers, so the batch file may give errors during that part of the execution.  These errors can be ignored.

Finally, I found this Microsoft Knowledge Base article on changing the initial storage area that VSS uses when it creates snapshots.   See the More Information section at bottom of this document: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/826936

I found recommendations that this be set to the maximum 3GB size (3000 decimal).  You need to be sure that you have 3GB of disk space available if you increase this number to the max.  I set the size of the MinDiffAreaFileSize key to 3000 decimal and most of my servers then stopped having the VSS errors during the backup.  However, on my main file server, I received another VSS error that shows up in the Application log on my main file server that says:

Event ID 7001 in the Application log

VssAdmin: Unable to create a shadow copy: Insufficient storage available to create either the shadow copy storage file or other shadow copy data.

Command-line: ‘C:WINDOWSsystem32vssadmin.exe Create Shadow /AutoRetry=5 /For=\?Volume{0e23512e-ab34-11db-902d-0002b3c80089}’.

I then went back to that registry key and lowered theMinDiffAreaFileSize to 2000 (after making the registry change, you can cut the information in the event information after “Command-line:” and can paste it in a command prompt window to run a snapshot immediately.  Then go check the application log again to see if the snapshot was successful or not).  The snapshot failed at 2000 also, and finally has been running successfully set at 1000 for a couple weeks now.

I have now had successful backups now for a couple of weeks.  Hopefully this information is helpful is solving your issues with Backup Exec and VSS snapshot errors.

Capabilities and Limitations of the Apple iPad in a Standard Business Network Environment

The iPad is a great device. It’s light, ultra-portable, and you don’t have to take it out of your carry-on for airport security. It’s sleek and sexy. It’s remarkably versatile. Many people wonder: can I replace my Window laptop or MacBook with it? If I add a Bluetooth keyboard, is it a netbook?

You can try, but it’s like trying to get a Corvette to replace a pickup truck: they both serve the same fundamental purpose, but they each excel at different things. You can try to get your pickup up to 180 MPH, and you can try to haul a ton of bricks in your Corvette. With enough effort, “McGyver”-ing, and aftermarket accessories, you could no doubt accomplish each. But is it a good idea? And if you think it through ahead of time, do you really want to?

The longing to replace a laptop with an iPad is easy to understand. An iPad travels well. It’s simple to connect it to a Wi-Fi network, and you don’t have to wait for it to boot up. The battery lasts. When you’re not working, you can use it to play music, movies, or games. It’s a terrific reader for news and e-books. It’s a great email client for Gmail, AOL, and (if your company’s mail system supports it and the corporate policies allow it) Exchange mail, calendar, and contacts using ActiveSync.

But it’s important to remember that the iPad is NOT a laptop or a tablet PC. And, despite being an Apple product, it’s NOT a MacBook. It isn’t built on Windows or Mac OS X – its operating system (iOS) was originally developed for the iPhone. The interface uses multi-touch gestures and an accelerometer, making possible applications that can’t run on a PC or Mac. That also means that applications written for a PC or Mac can’t run on an iPad – unless the author specifically develops a version for iOS. Even then, they would need to publish their application through the Apple App Store (thus sharing their proceeds with Apple) – or you would need to jailbreak your iPad, voiding the warranty.

Importantly, the iPad (like the iPhone and iPod Touch) does NOT support Adobe Flash or Java, meaning that websites that use those technologies won’t behave as designed. Why not? Apple CEO Steve Jobs called the Adobe product insecure, buggy, battery-intensive, and incompatible with a touch interface.

The iPad is better at consuming information than it is at creating it. It’s great for creating and editing smaller emails and documents, but you’ll want a PC to create large or complex documents. Another challenge: once you’ve created or edited the smaller documents, you can email them from the iPad, but only one file per email. To send multiple files, you need to send multiple emails. This can be pretty cumbersome. You’ll note that as you explore the iPad you won’t even encounter the concept of a “file” as you would on a PC or Mac.

To think of the iPad as a replacement for a netbook, notebook, or MacBook is like thinking of the Corvette as a replacement for a Ford F350. Is it fair to call the iPad an overgrown iPhone? No. It’s a terrific multi-function device with some very valuable business purposes in specific situations. Should you expect it to behave like a Windows machine or Mac? You’ll only end up frustrated if you do.

Love the iPad for what it is, and don’t hate it for what it isn’t. And don’t expect your IT consulting company to help you make it do what it’s not designed to do – they can’t fit a ton of bricks in a Corvette, either.

So… what CAN the iPad do in a business network environment? In other words, what is reasonable to expect your company’s I.T. team to support?

  • Email access. If your company allows remote email access from a smartphone using POP or IMAP protocols, you can do it from your iPad. Note, however, that it’s up to you go get the iPad connected to the Internet on the remote Wi-Fi. If you have a 3G iPad, getting it on the Internet is strictly between you, Apple, and AT&T.
  • Calendar/Contact synchronization – if your company has a fairly new Exchange server and the network is configured to allow ActiveSync access. If you have a non-BlackBerry smartphone that wirelessly syncs Calendar/Contacts, your iPad can also.
  • Remote Desktop to a Terminal Server – if your company has a Terminal Server. If you have access using Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Connection software for either Windows or Mac, you can have access from your iPad. Be sure to get a good RDP app such as iTap RDP, which makes it easier to operate a Windows desktop from with the iPad’s smaller display, and makes the best use of the iPad’s direct manipulation and multi-touch gestures.
  • VPN access. If your company allows VPN connections from other devices, such as an IPSec VPN tunnel to a Cisco firewall or a PPTP connection to a Windows RAS Server, you can have the same connection from your iPad. You might use it to establish a Remote Desktop Connection to your office workstation, if your company’s policies allow this.

Now… what CAN’T you expect your company’s I.T. team to support? Pretty much anything not listed above. At its heart, the iPad is a consumer device, and is probably not included in the list of officially-sanctioned “clients” for your company’s server-based applications. There’s no doubt that the iPad will continue to evolve, and new apps are released every day that enhance its functionality and usefulness. But, as a mobile network device, it presents challenges in terms of data security, bandwidth usage, and compatibility. These translate into significant I.T. support costs, so don’t be too surprised if your company won’t support it.

Microsoft Exchange Cloud Offering Has Limitations – BPOS

BVA has seen a lot of ups and downs with the Microsoft in-the-cloud offering with Exchange.  We have been a BPOS partner for over two years with great success overall but have run into some small and large problems that we want to disclose.  One of the biggest problems with the offering is that Microsoft does not backup the mail data over 14 days through an OST locally on the users hard drive as well as one in the Cloud Store.  Another problem is the sub-folder size and being extremely careful with the deletion process with those sub-folders.  Meaning in one scenario, a client deleted a sub-folder that was greater than 2GB in size and as a result deleted it from the OST for recovery.  There is an outlook rule where it states that any sub-folder deleted that is over the size of 3GB will not go to the recycling bin but rather delete completely off the store.  There is no way to restore the the file from the cloud or the local OST which can be quite painful.  This has been verified with Microsoft and they really do not have a good reason of why this is the case.  Microsoft’s suggestion is to purchase an additional service called Email Archiving for an additional $4.25.  The cost for some of the BPOS offerings are as followed:

Technical Support (All Break Fix issues, Partner Care questions and routing)

BPOS Technical Support

Available to customers and  partners who  are acting on behalf of their BPOS customers

1-866-MSONLINE, 1-866-441-8425, (425)-704-4614

https://admin.microsoftonline.com/login.aspx?ReturnUrl=%2fDefault.aspx 23

http:/www.microsoft.com/online/default.mspx

BVA Recommends Blackberry Server Enterprise Express Edition!

Recently, BVA began recommending the Blackberry Server Enterprise Express edition to many of our small to medium sized clients due to the fact that it is now FREE. This seems to be a move by RIM due to the fact that there are so many Active-Sync phones (iPhone, Droid, HTC-EVO, etc…) that are flooding the market and can accomplish the same tasks as a blackberry (sync contacts, calendar, and email) with no expensive server.  It is extremely cost effective and very functional, and allows all of your mobile devices to be managed from a central location.

What is the price?

It’s free! Yep that is correct it now costs you nothing! You simply download the application and install it in your existing exchange environment (We recommend you have a professional do the install).

What do I need?

You need to have existing infrastructure with a Microsoft Exchange server or Small Business Server. It will support up to 75 users when installed on top of the Exchange server. If you require more users, it is recommended that you install it on a separate server.

What features does it have?

Although it is now free, there are still many features available. Blackberry Server Enterprise Express edition has an easy to use web based management console that can be accessed from any PC, making it very easy for consulting companies and administrators to create and manage users.

It also offers multiple IT policies to help govern your workforce. You can also push out applications, create groups, and even push device software updates seamlessly to the users.

GET IT NOW!

If you feel that your organization could benefit from this great FREE piece of software, let BVA help. We have installed the Blackberry Server Enterprise Express edition in a wide variety of environments and configurations. From a single small business server to companies with many servers, we can help you accomplish the task.

For more information on Blackberry Enterprise Express Edition, please see the video below.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9hlQX58IgGQ[/youtube]

XML Tags Showing up in Outlook Signature

Has anyone ever come across the issue with Microsoft outlook and the pink XML tags showing in their signature? I recently came across this and really could not find an easy way to turn them off. I don’t know if it was a shortcut key that prompted these tags to come up but it was somewhat a nuisance.

So what did I do? I tried looking through the settings, checking, and unchecking certain settings to see if it would make a difference, but nothing seemed to fix it. I even tried multiple key combinations in my own outlook to recreate the issue. No luck! Furthermore, I kept trying until I thought, why don’t I just recreate the signature?

So that is what I did. I deleted the old signatures, created brand new ones, and then there were no more  pink xml tags in my signature! I just wish there was some kind of switch or button to turn these off, as I see many people searching for this issue on the internet with no solutions.

I guess it is like I said before, just recreate the signature!


MS Project 2010 compatibility issue with older versions

I recently received a request from a user where they were having issues opening a Microsoft Project file and I thought I would share my findings. It’s not that it is so much a complex or difficult issue as it is a frustrating one, and shows you how sometimes people get a sour taste in their mouth about Microsoft.

The issue started when the user received a MS project file and tried opening it with MS Project 2007 which we have installed on our terminal servers. Project threw an error saying that this file was created in a new version and that we could download the converter in order to make it work. Well here is where the issue comes in. When we went to the link with the recommended fix, it took us to a site where we could download MS Project 2003 SP3 which contains a converter tool. I thought really?? Why would I install a service pack for an older version that does not even exist on my system?

Apparently the only converter tool available for Project 2007 is to open and convert Project 2003 files, which is rather annoying because you would think a compatibility patch or something would have been released when Project 2010 was. Probably asking too much right?

The funny part of the whole situation is the actual solution Microsoft proposes on the Project 2010 website (see below).

Now wouldn’t it just be easier to ask the sender to save it as an older version?

LogMeIn Rescue and iPads – Is LogMeIn a Viable Solution – How LogMeIn Works With iPads and Mail | BVA IT Consulting Blog

If you haven’t seen this yet, please note – LogMeIn Rescue makes it easy to push out mail profiles to iPads.  Have the user go to http://rescuemobile.com in Safari on the iPad and enter the PIN code as usual.  You can then fill in the POP/IMAP/ActiveSync info and push it to the iPad as a profile.  The user is prompted to allow the config change, and then to accept the certificate.  Works great and BVA certainly recommends it as a viable solution.

Top Reasons Why Internet Explorer 9 Will Remain The Most Used Browser – Is Microsoft Internet Explorer The Most Used Browser – Why IE 9 Is Better For The Enterprise | BVA IT Consulting Blog

It is still left to be determined but so far so good. BVA has seen a few problems with integration with third party custom applications as well as add-ins but for the most part this new browser is pretty good.  We have it in production with over 15 clients across different market segments and feel confident in the product.  What’s funny is that Microsoft’s Internet Explorer doesn’t get much love in the advanced IT Solutions industry. A lot of people complain and fault it for its security problems. They say it doesn’t work as well as competing browsers.  With the release of Internet Explorer 9, it’s becoming clearer that the chances of competing browsers like Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox beating Microsoft’s latest browser anytime soon seem unrealistic and most likely not going to happen.  Internet Explorer 9 might be in its infancy, but this new browser edition ensures companies will stick with Microsoft. Here’s some documented reasons:

1. It’s much faster

Internet Explorer 8 and other previous versions of the software loaded Web pages very slowly. In fact, Google’s Chrome browser easily bested Internet Explorer in speed tests. But Internet Explorer 9 is quite fast, thanks to Microsoft’s decision to utilize the computer’s graphics processor. The result is a browser that for most companies will deliver the speed needed.

2. It’s taking aim at Chrome

Speaking of speed, it’s clear that Internet Explorer 9 is taking aim at Google Chrome. The browser has taken on a cleaner, Chrome-like look, making it easier to navigate. Plus, it has ditched the search box, in favor of a single box that allows users to input a Website’s address or search for content. And by improving Internet Explorer 9’s speed, it seems clearer than ever that Microsoft views Google as its top competitor in the browser market.

3. Security hasn’t mattered in the past

Internet Explorer 6, for example, is widely considered one of the most insecure browsers ever released. But as those security problems persisted, companies continued to stick with Internet Explorer. So, while security is commonly a reason Internet Explorer critics give to try to persuade companies to switch from Microsoft’s browser, it would seem that most companies haven’t cared in the past. And if Internet Explorer 9 still suffers from security problems, it’s unlikely that many companies will switch.

4. It’s a vastly improved design

Internet Explorer 9 will likely deliver a far better experience to the average employee. Whereas previous versions of the browser were difficult for novice users to perform basic tasks, the new and improved design in Internet Explorer 9 provides power for advanced users and simplicity for novices. That alone should make Internet Explorer 9 a fine choice for companies looking to improve their browser productivity.

5. Solutions still rely on it

As more Web-based solutions make their way to the enterprise, Internet Explorer becomes even more important. In fact, several products currently in use by companies rely upon Internet Explorer to work. That alone makes Internet Explorer relevant. And it will likely ensure that Internet Explorer 9 will be the browser of choice for companies going forward.

6. The competition can’t cut it

Google’s Chrome and Mozilla Firefox are outstanding browsers. For consumers, they are arguably a better option than anything Microsoft puts out. But the corporate world is a different space. And for most enterprise customers, Chrome and Firefox can’t match Internet Explorer 9 in compatibility with enterprise applications, especially custom corporate applications. They don’t deliver the same experience.

7. The download manager is vastly improved

Microsoft made a major update to its download manager in Internet Explorer 9. When a user attempts to download something from the Web, a new “reputation” feature kicks in. It evaluates the source of the download, and if it doesn’t have a solid reputation, the warnings related to the download are made abundantly clear.  It’s not a guaranteed security safeguard, but it should go a long way in making IT Managers feel more comfortable giving employees access to the browser.

8. It’s an extension of Windows 7

Although Internet Explorer 9 won’t work with Windows XP, it’s a vastly improved extension of Windows 7. In fact, users can “pin” sites to their taskbar, giving them easy access to pages in the future. Those pinned items also boast added functionality in some cases. It seems that Microsoft is attempting to make its browser a viable component in Windows’ functionality. That’s a good thing from an employee-productivity perspective.

9. Microsoft’s cloud vision works for now

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer has been saying for months that his company views the cloud differently than some other firms. He seems to think that users are going to need a rich client, like Internet Explorer 9, to interact with the cloud, rather than a thin client. Some would disagree, but for now, Microsoft seems correct in that assumption. Internet Explorer 9 will work exceptionally well for a user’s cloud services. It will provide the kind of functionality most companies are looking for related to their cloud endeavors.

10. It’s a familiar experience

In the end, Internet Explorer 9 isn’t so drastically different that users won’t feel at home. In fact, the browser provides a familiar experience that most enterprise employees would feel comfortable with and that’s a good thing. It should help Internet Explorer 9 enjoy the kind of success that Microsoft hopes it will achieve.

Can You Print Wirelessly From an iPad – Process for Printing Wirelessly Using an iPad – Hewlett-Packard Printer Integration With iPad | BVA IT Consulting Blog

Apple announced that the company is releasing the beta version of its AirPrint wireless printing for iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch, a key component of Apple’s iOS 4.2 software update, illustrates the extent to which the ability to print wirelessly is being taken by hardware and software developers alike. Although Apple’s products don’t find their way into the offices of small to medium size businesses nearly as often as brands such as HP, Dell and countless others, the capability to print wirelessly, particularly from your mobile device, is becoming of greater importance.  Apple announced Hewlett-Packard printers would be the first to support AirPrint with compatible devices to include HP Photosmart, Officejet Pro and LaserJet Pro series ePrint-enabled printers. However, HP offers its own line of printers offering Bluetooth wireless technology, and many more HP printers can be upgraded to support Bluetooth with the purchase of the HP bt500 Bluetooth Adapter. HP notes on its mobile printing Website that while many phones no longer require any further steps, some phones require users to pair their devices prior to printing for the first time.

 

Microsoft Lync Review – Analysis of Microsoft Lync – Is Microsoft Lync Viable | BVA IT Consulting Blog

BVA has reviewed and looked at the new Microsoft Lync.  The new name for the next generation of our real-time communications products, known until today as Communications Server and Communicator. Over the last five years Microsoft has been on a journey to transform communications with the power of software.  Lync delivers on this vision by unifying enterprise voice, instant messaging and web, audio and video conferencing into a new, connected communications experience.  A key part of the release is the re-branding to Microsoft Lync.  Lync, a combination of “link” and “sync”, is about connecting people in new ways anytime, anywhere.  Beyond simplifying and shortening the current branding, customer research found that the name Lync appeals to end users and IT pros, even more than descriptive options like Communicator. This could seriously be an alternative to an on-site VOIP phone system via reliability, feature set, integration with Microsoft technologies, as well as cost.

The feedback on Lync 2010 has been pretty good from initial testers.  Here is a sample of the types of comments that Microsoft got from the TAP programs and internal beta:

  • “Just love, love, love the new UI.”
  • “An incredibly comprehensive set of tools, including integration into workflow with SharePoint”
  • “Everything I’ve tried to do, I’ve been successful so far.”
  • “[OCS 14] looks more user-friendly and visually it’s like, ‘wow’. It looks better and aesthetics are a lot better, especially when you are using an application nine hours a day.”
  • “The overall user experience is more engaging, convenient, and social-oriented, when compared to 2007 or 2007 R2. Thank you! :-)”

I’ve been using Lync – and as my only ‘phone’ – for the past month and the experience has been pretty solid.  A few of my favorite features:
1.       Switch between your head-set and phone in the middle of a call with device switching.
2.       Gotta run? Leave the office and take your call with you on your mobile phone.
3.       Select multiple people and click to make a group call, and then drag-and-drop someone into the conference from Outlook.
4.       Connect with family while you’re travelling – start a high-definition voice and video conversation with a Windows Live Messenger user.
5.       Hush that annoying meeting participant.   When someone is causing bad audio on the conference call, Lync will identify which phone to mute to improve quality – and productivity.

Something to consider moving forward when looking at different communication methods.  Is VOIP the way to go?